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ERA, Repositories and the Accessibility Framework

Alexander Cooke

Abstract:
This presentation will provide an update on the development the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative, the likely role of repositories in ERA and the status of the Accessibility Framework.

Biographical details:
Alex is the Director of Research Policy in the Research Excellence Branch at the Australian Research Council. He is responsible for the overarching policy for ERA, is business owner of the IT system being developed to assist the ERA initiative, known as the System to Evaluate the Excellence of Research, and is also involved in developing the Accessibility Framework for Publicly Funded Research.

What ORE can do for you - an entirely pun free presentation with no reference at all to mining. (Oops)

Peter Sefton

Abstract:

Open Archives Initiative Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE), is an important new protocol for representing compound objects, or aggregations, in a web environment. The system is generating a lot of development activity in the repository community some of which will be reported in this presentation. One of the main contributions of ORE will be a way to describe an item that is made up of several parts. The classic example is an HTML document and its images – until the advent of OAI-ORE there has been no standardized way to draw a line around such an aggregation. What may seem obvious to a reader has not been obvious to machines, for which the document and its images are treated as equivalent in status. Likewise ORE will help to define what is an item in a repository in a way that can help to make items portable between systems. It will also allow systems to exchange objects that are made up of multiple parts, such as a thesis with multiple chapters and data files, for example. The presentation will include some ORE demonstrations and discussion – showing some USQ work on how documents from a content management system can be automatically ingested into repository systems (we will demo with ICE, ePrints, VALET and Sun of Fedora), and how items can be migrated from one repository to another. There will also be some more speculative discussion of future possibilities and some examples of other work. OAI is a conceptually complex system with its own very tightly defined set of terms and some very refined and nuanced design. It is likely that for the most part, developers will work with OAI-ORE libraries to get things done, and for end users and repositarians the system will be completely transparent in much the same way most of us never need to look inside an OAI-PMH feed.

Challenges for data driven biomedical research

Associate Professor Ashley Buckle

Abstract:

Progress in biomedical research is increasingly data driven. This presents enormous challenges for the research community: rapid advances in computational methods require the availability of raw experimental data, such that it can be re-analyzed as techniques improve; will advances in workflow technology provide the basis for experimental reproduction from raw data, and can data formats be standardized to allow efficient data exchange? Should we be developing online data analysis tools alongside data repositories? high throughput experiments generate data at a frightening pace, but this is not matched by reliable annotation by expert humans - will automated annotation solve this? Federated approaches promise to address the problem of petabyte data sets, but it is not clear that this is a global solution. Traditional journals, although online, are outmoded and incapable of keeping pace with data driven research - do we need 'data-centric' journals that utilize cutting edge web 2.0 technologies? In this talk I will discuss how we are meeting these challenges in my research fields: structural biology and bioinformatics. It is clear that the biomedical community as a whole will need play a more active role in addressing the challenges of data access, format, archival and curation.

Biographical details:

Ashley completed his PhD in 1994 in the lab of Prof Sir Alan Fersht at Cambridge University, where he focused his research on the structure determination of protein-DNA and protein-protein complexes. As a postdoctoral then staff scientist at the MRC Centre Cambridge he made contributions to the understanding of protein stability, molecular recognition and the action of molecular chaperones. He relocated to Monash in 2003 and is currently a NHMRC Senior Research Fellow. His current research is split between structural studies of a variety of interesting biological systems (using protein crystallography), crystallographic methods development, and bioinformatics.

email: ashley.buckle@med.monash.edu.au

Websites:

http://www.med.monash.edu.au/biochem/staff/abuckle.html

http://www.tardis.edu.au/

http://refold.med.monash.edu.au/

http://www.foldeomics.org/pfd

http://code.google.com/p/mrgrid/

Developing practical management skills for digital repository content: legal issues

Professor Anne Fitzgerald and Kylie Pappalardo

Abstract:

The nature of research is changing.  It is now not uncommon for researchers to work in large-scale web-based collaborations that cut across disciplinary boundaries.  Increasingly, researchers are seeking to share not only their final research publications, but also their early-stage research data with the wider community in order to encourage broader participation and to accelerate discoveries.

Repositories of the future will hold any number of digital objects, including publications, research data, images and multi-media objects.  This will require repositories to be technically robust, but more importantly, the repository content will need to be actively managed so that access can be provided to the content within a proper legal framework.

It is critical for repository managers to have a practical understanding of what is involved in managing the legal rights and obligations relating to repository content and to be able to access the skills required to do so.  Legal issues such as copyright, privacy, confidential information and contractual obligations must be addressed in an ongoing manner to ensure that content can be deposited into and made available for access in the digital repository.

This presentation will address the legal issues that arise in the management of repositories, taking into account the new forms of content that will increasingly be included in repositories.  This presentation is not intended to deal with substantive legal issues but rather will seek to provide guidance on how to develop practical strategies for management of the legal issues.

Biographical details:

Professor Anne Fitzgerald is a Brisbane-based intellectual property and e-commerce lawyer and a member of the Queensland Bar.  Anne is a Professor of Law Research at QUT Law School where she works as a principal researcher in the OAK Law Legal Framework for E-Research projects and the Queensland node of the CRC for Spatial Information.   In 2002 Anne was awarded the JSD degree (Doctor of the Science of Law) by Columbia University New York and she also has a LLM(International Business Law)  from the University of London (University College). 

Anne has been teaching, researching and writing in the fields of intellectual property, internet and e-commerce law since the early 1990s.  She has conducted extensive research in these fields, resulting in the publication of several books and numerous articles and book chapters.  Since 1991, she has taught courses in the areas of intellectual property and e-commerce law to students in law, biotechnology, information technology, multimedia and electronic commerce courses, as well as to information technology professionals, writers and designers. Anne currently teaches in the undergraduate and postgraduate Internet Law and E-commerce Law and Technology Contracts courses offered at QUT Law School.  Each year since 2004, she has been the co-coordinator (with John Stonier) of the Patent Law and Commercialisation course in the  LLM program at QUT Law School.  Recent publications include: Intellectual Property Nutshell (3rd ed, Thomson, 2008), Internet and E-Commerce Law and Policy, (with B Fitzgerald et al, Lawbook Co/Thomson, 2007) and Intellectual Property Law: In Principle (with B Fitzgerald, Lawbook Co/Thomson, 2004).
Email: am.fitzgerald@qut.edu.au
Websites:
http://www.oaklaw.qut.edu.au
http://www.e-research.law.qut.edu.au/
http://www.law.qut.edu.au/staff/facstaff/afitzgerald.jsp

Kylie Pappalardo is a research officer for the Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project, based at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and led by Professor Brian Fitzgerald.  She holds a Bachelor of Laws (Hons.) degree and a Bachelor of Creative Industries (Creative Writing) degree from QUT.  She has also completed a Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice at QUT. 

Kylie is a co-author, along with Professor Anne Fitzgerald, of A Guide to Developing Open Access through Your Digital Repository (2007, OAK Law Project) and Building the Infrastructure for Data Access and Reuse in Collaborative Research: An Analysis of the Legal Context (2007, OAK Law Project).  She has also authored the recent publication, Understanding Open Access in the Academic Environment: A Guide for Authors (2008, OAK Law Project).

Kylie has given numerous conference presentations on behalf of the OAK Law Project, including the Australian Partnership for Sustainable Repositories (APSR) and the Australian Research Repositories Online to the World (ARROW) Adaptable Repository Workshop in Sydney in 2007.  Kylie provides voluntary legal advice at the Arts Law Centre of Queensland (ALCQ) and has taught Creative Industries Legal Issues to undergraduate students at QUT.  In 2007, Kylie was a recipient of the QUT Vice Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence.
Email: k.pappalardo@qut.edu.au
Websites:
http://www.oaklaw.qut.edu.au
http://www.e-research.law.qut.edu.au/

Exposing research data to direct, visual scrutiny in published papers

David G. Barnes and Christopher J. Fluke

Abstract:

New features in the Adobe PDF standard enable, for the first time, the in situ embedding of interactive, 3-dimensional visualisations of scientific data in academic papers. As well as presenting new opportunities for knowledge sharing, this technique also makes it relatively straightforward for researchers to submit their data to direct, visual scrutiny. We present examples of the technique and discuss our experiences in getting publishers to accept "non-archival" PDF format papers for publication. We comment on the challenges and opportunities for research repositories as the scientific publishing paradigm evolves to incorporate new features such as the one we describe here.

Biographical details:

David is a senior research fellow in the Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, at Swinburne University of Technology. David's formal training is in physics and radioastronomy, but his present-day work is firmly oriented towards computation and graphics for astronomy and science. David has held research and software positions at the CSIRO, the University of Melbourne, and Swinburne. He has been a principal investigator on competitive grants and has published widely in the radioastronomy and astronomy software discipilnes. Chris is a senior lecturer in the Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing at Swinburne University of Technology. Chris' formal training is in physics and cosmology. His present-day work is strongly focussed on the process of scientific visualisation, and high-quality public education and outreach in the sciences. As well as being a principal investigator on several high-profile research grants, Chris was the recipient of the prestigious Victoria Fellowship in 2000, and the Swinburne Vice Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Entrepreneurship in 2005.

The Australian National Data Service - Implications for Repositories

Andrew Treloar

Abstract:

This presentation will start by summarising the process that led to the creation of ANDS. It will then provide an overview of the ANDS Programs and what will happen in the first year of operation. The presentation will then discuss the implications for repositories (and repository managers) and conclude by outlining how people can get involved.

Biographical details:

Dr Andrew Treloar [http://andrew.treloar.net/] has a B. A. hons. (first class), majoring in Germanic Languages and Linguistics, a Grad. Dip. in computer science, and an M. A. with the topic A Computer-assisted analysis of characterisation in Virginia Woolf’s ‘The Waves’, all from Melbourne University. In 1999 he received his Ph. D. from Monash University with the topic Hypermedia Online Publishing - Transformation of the Scholarly Journal. He is currently the Director of the project to establish the Australian National Data Service (http://ands.org.au/). Previously he was the Director and Chief Architect of the ARCHER [http://archer.edu.au/] project and the ARROW [http://arrow.edu.au/] Technical Architect and DART [http://dart.edu.au] Project Architect. He has also held a number of management roles within ITS in the Web and Internet technologies area. Most significant of these was as Director, Information Management and Strategic Planning within Information Technology Services at Monash University. A major part of this role involved implementing the Monash University Information Management Strategy [http://www.monash.edu.au/staff/information-management/]. For much of his career he was an IT academic, most recently as a Senior Lecturer in Information Management at Deakin University. He has taught extensively in the areas of the Internet, database management, project management and electronic information sources. He has also consulted in Australia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, South Korea and Fiji. His research interests include data management, institutional repositories and scholarly communication. He never finds enough time for practising his ‘cello, reading, talking to his chickens, or working in his vegetable garden.

Metadata in repositories in the next three years

Katie Blake

Abstract:

The seismic shift in metadata for the digital age is the layers of metadata beyond the descriptive to the structural and the relationship.

Once we held a physical object in our hands and described it. Once we aggregated physical objects into collections that were housed together. Now we aggregate information about a range of different resources that live in different places. The metadata not only describes the creation and subject of each component, it must also describe the relationship this component has with other components and how they gather together to make a unit.

Digital information is all about fragmentation and coalescence of small bits into larger bits. Information is breaking apart. You can see it in blogs, in forum posts, in library catalogues. A bibliography, for example, is just a series of links.

Once we debated the merits of MARC vs MODS. In the next three years we are going to see a shift towards how to group descriptive metadata, technical metadata, and administrative metadata into structural maps. We are going to learn much more about RDF, ORE, METS, FRBR and more.

Biographical details:

 

Future Prospects and Challenges for Establishing a Qualitative Data Archive: The Researcher Perspective

Dr Lynda Chesire

Abstract:

The practice of archiving and re-using data for teaching and research purposes is well established among some sectors of the social sciences and humanities, including historians and quantitative researchers. For many qualitative researchers, however, the prospect of sharing data is relatively new and not at all straightforward. With qualitative data archiving already occurring in countries such as the UK, and with growing expectations among funding agencies that researchers deposit data for subsequent re-use, the Australian Social Science Data Archive (ASSDA) has begun developing a qualitative archive alongside its current catalogue of some 1,500 quantitative datasets. The aim of the archive is to provide qualitative researchers with a long-term site for data storage, as well as to facilitate data sharing among researchers through the provision of tools for retrieval and analysis. Nevertheless, there are a number of challenges to qualitative archiving that still need to be overcome, including a general aversion to the prospect of sharing data among many qualitative researchers due to ethical concerns, the potential for ‘misinterpretation’ of data by subsequent researchers, and the strong tradition among qualitative researchers of analysing one’s own data. In this presentation, I outline the plans for AQuA and the results of ongoing consultation with the qualitative research community around the future prospects and challenges of qualitative archiving. In addition, these raise broader debates about the way qualitative research is likely to be conducted and managed in the future.

Biographical details:

Lynda Cheshire is a senior lecturer in sociology at The University of Queensland where she teaches qualitative research methods to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Since 2006 she has been working with colleagues from ASSDA to develop a qualitative data archive and will take on the new role of Director of AQuA in 2009.

Moving the repository upstream

Chris Rusbridge

Abstract:

Scholars and researchers have proved surprisingly resistant to the advantages of repositories, and our exhortations and mandates have not greatly improved the situation. This may be because the process of deposit is outside their normal working practices, and provides them with few immediate advantages. Can we devise extensions to the repository that will actually help them do their research and publish their papers? Putting it another way, can we seduce them with a repository that lets them do their work with fewer clicks, rather than more? This is the motivation for exploring the idea of a Research Repository System that would integrate the repository and other supportive services, moving the repository upstream in the workflow and allowing the repository to capture significant versions of documents and data automatically as by-products of the service. This is a developing concept, and the session will explain current state and feedback so far, and invite further feedback at the meeting.

Biographical details:

Director of the Digital Curation Centre, whose overall mission is continuing quality improvement in data curation & digital preservation. Chris was previously Director of the Information Services at the University of Glasgow, active in the area of digital preservation, and before that he was Programme Director of the JISC Electronic Libraries Programme, where he was closely involved in many digital preservation activities including the CEDARS and CAMiLEON projects.